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Krita 2.8 brings open-source paint tool to Windows users

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014 | Posted by Jim Thacker

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An early preview of Krita 2.8′s new Color Balance filter. The new version of the open-source paint package, which includes a long list of other new features, is the first one fully supported on Windows as well as Linux.

Originally posted on 5 March. Scroll down for updates.

Open-source paint package Krita continues its transition from fan favourite to serious professional tool with Krita 2.8, described by the developers as the first release “fully supported” on Windows.

Limited Windows support was first introduced last year, in version 2.7.

Better support for graphics tablets
As a side benefit of the Windows port, the software’s tablet support has now been completely rewritten, providing native support for non-Wacom graphics tablets, and smoother drawing performance all round.

Linux users also get Krita Gemini: the option to switch from the desktop interface to the Krita Sketch touch-based interface, which is now bundled with the new release.

More tools for painting large images
There are also a lot of features for working on very large images, including a new high-quality scaling mode for the OpenGL canvas, a ‘pseudo-infinite’ canvas, and a new Wrap Around mode for tiling textures.

Other new functionality includes a nice-looking Clone Array tool; improved colour-picking options; a new Color Balance filter; and beta support for G’MIC-based filters.

The UI and workflow have been further tidied up, and there are a lot of smaller updates.

Versions and availability
Krita 2.8 is currently available in two completely free editions: the Desktop version for Windows and Linux and Krita Sketch for Windows tablets. A version for Ultrabooks will soon be available via Steam.

There is also the newish Krita Studio: a Windows and Linux version with commercial support and training, intended for games and VFX facilities.

140702_KritaMac
 

Updated 2 July: The Krita Foundation has released Krita for OS X – or a proof-of-concept build, at any rate. You’ll need to install it via Terminal, and it’s still missing quite a few features.

You can help the Mac version become production-ready faster by backing Krita’s Kickstarter campaign. The campaign just hit its main €15,000 target, but OS X support is a €75,000 stretch goal.

Read more about the new features in Krita 2.8

Download Krita 2.8 for Linux

Download Krita 2.8 for Windows

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  • http://www.cubelabmedia.com/ T.E. Mencer

    I actually started using Krita a while ago and I have to say, it’s better than I could have hoped for. Blows Photoshop out of the water for digital painting and drawing.

  • Sarower Reza

    “providing native support for non-Wacom graphics tablets”-
    does it mean I can’t work in Krita with my Wacom tablet?

  • Boudewijn Rempt

    No, it means that in addition to Wacom tablets, other tablets, such as the Huion tablets are supported, too. Which brands work best is something to experiment with. We only have Wacom and Huion (because the manufacturers helped us with hardware), so monoprice or genius might be more difficult.

  • Sarower Reza

    Thanks! :)

  • Brian Lockett

    I’m a long-time user of Krita, using it back when it first offered experimental Windows builds. It’s so nice to finally see a stable release for the Windows version. It’s certainly come a long way.

    I’m looking forward to future developments of this promising software, and I’m hoping Krita 2.9 brings just one thing that would immediately put Krita into every fellow game developer’s toolkit: Support for .raw (and possibly .r16) heightmaps.

    Currently, Photoshop is just about the only 2D image editor that allows the editing and creation of such heightmaps, which are most commonly used in game engines like Unity. Some other 3D programs allow for editing .raw heightmaps, but sometimes, you just need 2D editing.

    If Krita supported this soon, it’d not only see tons of local indie developer support, but probably a growing number of big-company developers starting to adopt it, as well.

    It’s surprising just how widely-used heightmaps are these days (from everything from asset creation to game modding), but how few programs allow the editing and creation of them. There’s a startling lack of such solid programs where one can edit, create, import and export their .raw heightmaps in one stop.

    And if Krita adopted this feature soon, it’d come in just in time, too, since Krita recently got green-lit at Steam. I think the .raw editing feature alone would instantly make thousands of new Krita users worldwide. It might just help shift a whole dynamic in greater Krita support.

  • Boudewijn Rempt

    We’ve got support for r16 files now. At least, I hope so — I haven’t tested it with a game engine because I haven’t got those.

  • http://macromanjr.blogspot.com/ Brian Lockett

    Fantastic news! This is great news, esp. for those developers using Unity game engine. I’d love to test it out, whenever it’s available. I think I’ll even make a video showing off the new feature and the workflow it now allows.

    And if you want to test it out, you can download the free version of Unity and test it out. If you need a video showing how to set up a new heightmap, I made a video a while back showing how to import an .r16 heightmap into Unity.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFUviSU8v0w

    You can skip to 15:18 in the video to get to the .r16 export part, though if you want to learn a bit more about creating a quick heightmap, maybe the whole video might help–just adapt the workflow to Krita instead of the other program I used.

    Thanks for the update!

  • Guest

    can you give me a link for OSX version?

  • http://marktomlinson.com/ Mark Tomlinson

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